Largest-Ever LitiQuest Inspires Lawyers to Embrace A.I and Data

December 20, 2019

Four hundred legal professionals gathered at the iconic TWA Hotel on November 7-8, 2019 for the third annual LitiQuest NYC. This year’s conference featured inspiring general sessions and dozens of hands-on workshops to help attendees collectively push the legal industry to new heights.

Four hundred legal professionals gathered at the iconic TWA Hotel on November 7-8, 2019 for the third annual LitiQuest NYC. This year’s conference featured inspiring general sessions and dozens of hands-on workshops to help attendees collectively push the legal industry to new heights.

Futurists Peter Coffee and Chrissie Lightfoot shared how machine learning and artificial intelligence will soon shake up law, while lawyers Keith Mitnik, Sam Pond, and John Morgan offered attendees strategies for transforming their businesses.

Here are just a few of the legal technology trends discussed at this year’s LitiQuest NYC.+

1. Rapid change is the new normal


Peter Coffee, Vice President of Strategic Research at Salesforce, opened LitiQuest by warning that the daunting pace of change we’re currently experiencing is the slowest it will be for the rest of our lives. 

As companies rush to deliver the next revolutionary product or program, it’s up to lawyers to be the cautionary voices in the room. Invasions of privacy are now rampant, with unlawful tracking and selling of private data making headlines every day, and new inventions like self-driving cars aren’t as foolproof as we’d like them to be. Coffee urged lawyers to use their positions of authority to ensure innovation doesn’t come at the expense of consumer privacy or safety. 

The cataclysmic changes we’re seeing, Coffee shared, are akin to sonic booms. If we don’t get ahead of them and understand how to properly “surf” the shock waves, we’ll be left unequipped to handle this new normal.

2. A.I. is more sophisticated than you think

Soft skills that we thought would always give humans the clear advantage over machines, like strategic thinking, empathy, and intuition, are no longer unique to humans. Robots are now capable of these soft skills, too, Chrissie Lightfoot, CEO of EntrepreneurLawyer and Robot Lawyer LISA, pointed out. 

Rather than replace human lawyers, A.I. lawyers will fill holes where human lawyers aren’t currently present, and do the tasks that human lawyers don’t want to do or can’t do as efficiently as their robot counterparts. Tasks like legal research and contract review, for example, are areas where machines can help supplement the work of human lawyers. 

By embracing A.I., the legal industry will evolve at a much faster rate. In the future, Lightfoot revealed, we’ll see human lawyers and A.I. lawyers working side-by-side to resolve cases.